Saturday, February 2, 2008

National Politics

Well, the races have narrowed now. On the Democratic side, Obama and Clinton will duke it out for the nomination. I hated to see John Edwards bow out because I think he offered another alternative. The Democratic "debate" was more civil, at least on the surface. The candidates talked about the issues instead of having the childish "I said, you said" arguments the Republicans were guilty of the night before. I don't believe that Clinton is electable because of the baggage that she carries. She will be an easy target for the Republican mud slingers and their "Swift Boat Veteran" propaganda. Obama will be a much more difficult candidate for them to smear, primarily because of his race. If they jump him too hard there will be a backlash. They may have to run on the issues, which will be much more interesting, because I don't believe that the so-called "social conservatives" make up that much of a difference in the voting public.

I feel more sorry for John McCain every day. He once stood for something as an outspoken maverick, who wasn't afraid to buck the establishment. Now he has become a poor syncophant, who has sold his soul to the devil for the so-called "social conservative" vote. To me there is nothing worse than a politician who changes his views simply to buy votes. We have one of those here in Georgia. Zell Miller has changed so many times he can't see straight anymore. McCain was a moderate, who questioned the right to life people, he spoke out against the war in Iraq, and he had more liberal views on immigration. Now that he is running hard for president he has changed his talk and is anti-abortion, anti-immigrant and pro-Iraq. He accuses Romney of flip-flopping, but he has done the same, probably even more. It is a shame that moderates, who have a chance to move this country away from the extreme ends of the political spectrum, give up their long held views to pander to a particular group in order to get elected.

The Republican candidate who has remained the same is Huckabee. I don't agree with him on some issues, but I respect his remaining constant. Ron Paul is considered to be a nut, but he is the only Republican who has the guts to tell the truth. It is scary to listen to him present the facts and to see the smirks on the faces of the other candidates. They are so partisan that they refuse to acknowlege that their party has made mistakes.

At any rate, I am waiting with baited breath for "Super Tuesday" to see how this thing plays out. It will be interesting to see if Obama makes up ground on Clinton and whether McCain is able to consolidate his support among those within the Republican party who continue to distrust his changing views.

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